Thursday 16 August 2018
You are here:Blog»Philosophy»Buddhism»Dharma»Always Present
Tuesday, 07 March 2017 16:47

Always Present

Always Present - coverAlways Present
- The Luminous Wisdom of Jigme Phuntsok
— by Jigme Phuntsok

What is true happiness? What is the cause of our suffering and dissatisfaction? And how can we live with the kindness and clarity of the Buddha in our own lives?

This compact collection of teachings from Jigme Phuntsok Rinpoche illuminates these most fundamental questions about the Buddhist path and provides essential guidance to help you along the way.

Oriented to both beginners to Buddhism and longtime practitioners alike, these teachings offer precious insights on the Buddhadharma to return to again and again for inspiration, encouragement, and practical advice.

Buddha Gautama sitting on a lion throneH.H. Jigme Phuntsok (1933–2004) was a prominent teacher in the Nyingma tradition of Tibetan Buddhism who was recognized as a terton (treasure revealer) and renowned for his mastery of Dzogchen. Unlike many Tibetan masters who fled to India and the West, Jigme Phuntsok remained in China throughout the Cultural Revolution and played a major role in maintaining and reviving Buddhism in the region. He established a nonsectarian Buddhist community called Larung Gar near the town of Sertar in China's Sichuan Province, where he taught thousands of students, many of Han Chinese ethnicity.
 

  Download / Read

Jigme Phuntsok Rinpoche was a truly incredible and inspirational master. Through his visionary activity, Rinpoche created one of the largest monastic settlements the world has ever seen - a vibrant center that has contributed enormously to the recent resurgence of Buddhism in Tibet and China. Now that this wonderfully pithy collection of his teachings has been made available through the efforts of his extraordinary spiritual heir, Khenpo Sodargye, I have no hesitation in wholeheartedly recommending it to all seekers of truth and sincere followers of the Buddhadharma.

Sogyal Rinpoche, author of The Tibetan Book of Living and Dying

Leave a comment

Make sure you enter all the required information, indicated by an asterisk (*). HTML code is not allowed.