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Thursday, 26 December 2019 22:10

Compassionate Warrior

Uncommon Happiness - The Path of the Compassionate Warrior — by Dzigar Kongtrul

The guidance to undergo mind training with the right attitude of clarity and commitment.

Published in Dharma
Saturday, 03 September 2016 17:01

Now That I Come to Die

Now That I Come to Die - Intimate guidance from one of Tibet's greatest masters — by Longchenpa

A collection of works by Longchenpa - the great master of Tibetan Buddhism.

Published in Dharma
Thursday, 16 July 2015 18:39

Buddhism With an Attitude

Buddhism With an Attitude - The Tibetan Seven-Point Mind Training — by B. Alan Wallace

This work explains Lojong - a fundamental type of Buddhist mental training which is designed to shift our attitudes so that our minds become pure wellsprings of joy instead of murky pools of problems, anxieties, fleeting pleasures, hopes, and frustrations.

Published in Dharma
Sunday, 12 July 2015 17:55

Mind Training

Mind Training — by Ringu Tulku

This work gives instructions for tonglen breathing practice that ties the concepts of lojong to the physical act of breathing. Focuses simply on giving up, self-cherishing, and transforming self-centered thinking into compassion, egoistic feelings into altruism, desire into acceptance, and resentment into joy.

Published in Dharma
Sunday, 12 July 2015 17:41

Practice of Lojong

The Practice of Lojong - Cultivating Compassion Through Training the Mind — by Traleg Kyabgon

For many centuries Indian and Tibetan Buddhists have employed this collection of pithy, penetrating Dharma slogans to develop compassion, equanimity, loving kindness, and joy for others. Known as the Lojong - or mind-training - teachings, these slogans have been the subject of deep study, contemplation, and commentary by many great masters.

Published in Dharma
Wednesday, 24 June 2015 00:00

Kindly Bent to Ease Us

Kindly Bent to Ease Us — by Longchenpa

Longchenpa offers a guide to enlightenment that begins with traditional reflections on the preciousness of a human existence, finite in time but unlimited in opportunities. The translator - Dr. H. V. Guenther - introduces each chapter with explications based on Longchenpa's own commentaries.

Published in Dharma